Saturday

Program Saturday

Conference during the day & closing event in the evening.
For the conference program please register by 11th June 2017 using this tool.
The Conference will be mainly in German, you can find the English program or translated program in the headlines.

Drawing on a performance festival in Shiraz in southern Iran (1967-77), the keynote speaker will highlight what a cross-border definition of art could be. In showcasing Asian, South American and African productions, and in not differentiating between traditional rituals and artistic practice, this festival defies European understandings of art and culture.

Following the keynote, a series of workshops will explore methods and approaches for creating more critical arts and a cultural practices. Different forms of discrimination, such as racism, ableism and classism, will be explored intersectionally. Language and power, antidiscriminatory writing, and paths to creating a more inclusive arts and culture scene in Berlin, are just a few of the topics the workshops will address. There will be a workshop looking specifically at best practice examples of diversity work, picking up on the previous day’s explorations of self-empowerment and diversity processes within local authorities. Today’s program also offers an introduction to the concept of intersectionality, as well as a guided tour revealing the contours of Germany’s colonial past still found in today’s cityscape.

11.00 am

The Festival of Arts was a radical artistic and cultural festival of performing arts, held annually in Shiraz and the ancient ruins of Persepolis every summer between 1967-1977. By the early 1970s, the Festival of Arts had become a crucial player in a complex network of creative expression circumventing divisions of North-South and South-South and the Cold War. It articulated a radical Third World-ism in line with the Non-Aligned Movement and, in doing so, facilitated a uniquely transformative crucible of artistic exchange and experience. It was successful in its artistic and diplomatic undertaking to bring together artists from across the North-South divide and both sides of the Cold War political standoffs.

12.00 pm Break

1.00 pm Workshops, inputs & panels

The project ‘Decolonising Arts and Cultural Education’ will be presented and discussed. Developed by Carmen Mörsch as part of a Senior Fellowship at the Mercator Foundation and in partnership with Alice Salomon University, this project focuses on methods and materials used in training practitioners of arts and cultural education, with view to embedding anti-discrimination in their practice.

Positioned within postcolonial and decolonial understandings, and drawing on selected works, this talk will take a look at Belinda Kazeem-Kamiński’s artistic practice, intention and drive. A desire to expose the production of colonial knowledge and the colonial gaze is central to Kazeem-Kamiński’s work, as is the theoretical-artistic critical investigation of questions relating to violent gallery viewing regimes. The talk will contemplate ways in which colonial violence can be addressed without reproducing violent relations and will be followed by an open discussion chaired by Ivana Pilic.

Which terms, concepts and approaches are a challenge to the sustainable diversification of the arts and culture sector, and which promote it? Anchored in human rights and anti-discrimination, this workshop invites us to forge new paths through this fog of concepts and approaches. Beyond looking closely at terms such as ‘Migrationshintergrund’ (with a migration background) and ‘interkultureller Öffnung’ (intercultural opening up), this workshop will also draw on positive examples from Germany and abroad, coupled with the latest research in Berlin, to explore concrete options for action.

This workshop will look at approaches to diversity and anti-discrimination in the arts and culture sector, particularly the centrality of addressing intersectionality. Together we will explore language, image and narrative as often found in the arts and cultural scene. How far are different belongings, positionalities and discriminations made visible? How are these addressed? How do different forms of discrimination inter-act and how does this impact people’s lives? What opportunities are there to address various experiences of discrimination in the arts and culture sector and develop counter- strategies? At what level could these strategies be implemented? The workshop will give an introduction to the concept of intersectionality and participants will have the opportunity to take an intersectional look at the arts and culture scene. This requires participants to be open to reflecting upon their own positionality and privilege. Rather than going through a checklist, we will have the opportunity to work together on developing strategies.

After an introduction to Berlinklusion, Berlin’s new network for accessibility in arts and culture, participants will work with artists with and without disabilities in a practical creative workshop that draws from the history and physical fabric of Podewil and its surrounds. The workshop concludes with a discussion exploring the existing structures within the cultural field, their limitations and impact on in/exclusion and their hidden possibilities for accessibility.

3.00 pm Break

3.30 pm Workshops, inputs & panels

How can discriminatory language in texts and images be analysed? What might non-discriminatory language look like and what lies behind the demand for ‘respectful’ reporting? Using examples of representations of poverty and experiences of poverty, the workshop will explore different media strategies relating to this topic.  In view of current work conditions in the media sector, as well as  questions of access to the profession,  we will discuss the issue of diversity in the editorial process.

Many organisations in the cultural sector have begun to feel the importance of diversifying their programs, staff and audiences. Many larger organisations have decided in favour of diversification. To discuss this topic, this talk brings together Anja Schütze from Bundesvereinigung Kulturelle Kinder- und Jugendbildung (BKJ) (National Association of arts and cultural education for young people), an organisation currently in the process of diversifying its arts and culture volunteering program; and Vanja Mandić, who will draw on her experience as a museum scholarship holder of the ‘Kulturelle Vielfalt und Migration’ (Cultural Diversity and Migration) project. The challenges and opportunities relating to opening up to a diversification process, as encountered in respective projects, will be shared and discussed.

Like it’s current arts, culture, economy and politics, Berlin’s cityscape is riddled with colonial continuities. Viewed with a critical eye, the Berlin district of Mitte reveals a red thread stretching from the slave trade to colonialism to National Socialism and beyond.  Both colonial violence and anti-colonial resistance are undeniably imprinted in Germany’s daily life. This tour will follow the traces of colonialism and resistance through Berlin’s streets (beginning at Ermelerhaus, moving up M-Straße to Humboldt University and Forum).

This workshop will look at approaches to diversity and anti-discrimination in the arts and culture sector, particularly the centrality of addressing intersectionality. Together we will explore language, image and narrative as often found in the arts and cultural scene. How far are different belongings, positionalities and discriminations made visible? How are these addressed? How do different forms of discrimination inter-act and how does this impact people’s lives? What opportunities are there to address various experiences of discrimination in the arts and culture sector and develop counter- strategies? At what level could these strategies be implemented? The workshop will give an introduction to the concept of intersectionality and participants will have the opportunity to take an intersectional look at the arts and culture scene. This requires participants to be open to reflecting upon their own positionality and privilege. Rather than going through a checklist, we will have the opportunity to work together on developing strategies.

After an introduction to Berlinklusion, Berlin’s new network for accessibility in arts and culture, participants will work with artists with and without disabilities in a practical creative workshop that draws from the history and physical fabric of Podewil and its surrounds. The workshop concludes with a discussion exploring the existing structures within the cultural field, their limitations and impact on in/exclusion and their hidden possibilities for accessibility.

6.00 pm Closing Event with concerts

Elsa aka AMET is a sound artist from Cameroon who was partly raised in Germany. She works with time based media, mostly in the form of sound performance and experimental podcast. Her work uses words and sounds in the form of transcoding, code switching and algorithms. Her current work process has been taking place mostly in African and diasporic communities and tries to build a fine print of electronic griotage reaching from the past into the future. As the philosopher Mudibe said, “Africa is an invention, for that matter Africans have to (re-)invent themselves.”
soundcloud.com/elsambala

Being of Eritrean descent music and dance are an artistic way of reconnecting with the roots of her family. She now lives in Berlin and has taken on subjects like unity, love, freedom and social justice.
She sound is a mixture of Trip-hop, Soul, and R&B. Her music is for all those, who use their voices to motivate change and have an impact. Her main emphasis lies on empowering people to find their way not be fearful, especially those who struggle with insecurities.
Watch her Video ‘Affection.’

Born was born in Mombasa and grew up in Cologne.  She sings in German and Swahili and combines Rap, Soul and Afrobeat in her music. Confidently she questions her cultural belonging as a Kenyan woman in the diaspora and her experiences as an Afro-German in a white society – she thereby showing racist stereotypes against people of color.

Watch her ‘Afro Spartana’ Video.

In her music Nadia explores the limits of personal and political identity.  Born in Sweden as a Muslim with an Iranian background, her teenage years were characterized by misadaptation and the sense of not belonging, which lay the essential foundation for her futural music creation that is defined by self-representation , defying  authority and breaching boundaries. Her sound is initiated by the borderless and revolting punk-attitude, applied on everything in between fragile pop melodies, rhythmic electro beats and hip hop.

http://nadiatehran.com